Stamp Catalogs - Part 2

The catalogs themselves will give a great deal of help in their introductory pages, and anyone who uses a catalog is urged to first consult these pages before attempting to look up any particular stamp. Minkus World Wide Catalog gives extensive background data on the personages and designs on each stamp. Enlarging portions of the stamps are used copiously to show important differences between similar appearing stamps. The illustrated pages from the Minkus Catalog on pages of this book will make the importance of these features clear to any collector. The Scott "segregated" system consists of grouping the stamps according to their various categories. Thus, for any one country, all regular postage stamps are grouped and are listed in chronological order of their issue beginning with the first issue as number 1. This group is followed by semi-postals, then by listings of all of the airmail stamps beginning again with the first issue as number 1.

To identify these two "number 1's" from each other, a prefix letter is added to each group other than the regular postage issues. Thus, in the Scott Catalogue number "C1" would indicate an airmail stamp, number "J1" would indicate a postage due stamp. Various other prefix letters are used to identify various other categories of stamps. With Scott's "segregated" system the collector who limits his interests to only airmail stamps may find the listing of these without the bother of searching them out. However, there are few collectors limiting their interests to any of the other segregated groups.

Minkus New World-Wide Stamp Catalog
Minkus New World-Wide Stamp Catalog

The fellow who limits his interest to regular postage issues almost always includes airmail stamps, for these are, in his opinion, at least, "regular" issues. That is, they are not semipostal, postage due, or other service issues. Their function is to pay postage. For this collector, who is by far in the majority of all collectors, the Scott "segregated" system requires him to look in at least two places of each country for the stamps he collects. Still another disadvantage lies in the fact that any person using Scott Catalogues must know before he consults the catalogue into just which category the stamp before him falls. When the Minkus Catalog first appeared, some of the older, more conservative collectors showed reluctance to change to a new, up-to-date catalog. However, after seeing the many better features of the new Minkus Catalog, many have already been won over. In this writer's opinion, the Minkus "integrated" system of listing stamps is the most logical and sensible method and will, in due course, predominate. In the few years the "Minkus New World-Wide Catalog" has been published it has had very wide acceptance and each annual edition exceeds the quantity produced for each preceding edition.